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China publishes new high-quality images of the Moon’s surface

china-publishes-new-high-quality-images-of-the-moons-surface

The China National Space Administration has published hundreds of previously unseen high-quality images, videos and scientific data of the Moon. The information was gathered by the Chang'e-3 lunar rover and is now available to anyone who is interested in it.

Image credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences/China National Space Administration/The Science and Application Centre for Moon and Deep Space Exploration/Emily Lakdawalla

Image credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences/China National Space Administration/The Science and Application Centre for Moon and Deep Space Exploration/Emily Lakdawalla

China was the third world's nation that landed on the moon, after US and Russia, and it was the first soft-landing after Russia's Luna 24 probe in 1976.

Image credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences/China National Space Administration/The Science and Application Centre for Moon and Deep Space Exploration/Emily Lakdawalla.

Image credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences/China National Space Administration/The Science and Application Centre for Moon and Deep Space Exploration/Emily Lakdawalla

The images were captured in the period between 2013 and 2015 during a mission with Chang'e-3 lander and the Yutu rover. The goal of the mission was to conduct geological analysis of the Moon's surface and the research concluded it could be, in fact, less homogenous than previously suggested.

Image credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences/China National Space Administration/The Science and Application Centre for Moon and Deep Space Exploration/Emily Lakdawalla

The Chinese plan to explore the surface of the Moon further and plan to send the Chang'e-5 spacecraft to collect additional soil samples in 2017. Also, the Chang'e-4 mission set to begin in 2018 could be the first ever to land on the far side of the moon.

Featured image credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences/China National Space Administration/The Science and Application Centre for Moon and Deep Space Exploration/Emily Lakdawalla

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One Comment

  1. These pictures, along with the pictures on Mars and the images of Moon landing, tell a story.

    Both the Moon and the Mars have no or little atmosphere.

    On the other hand, Japan’s Sakurajima volcano flares to life in an eruption of lava and lightning.

    Enjoy the show. Enjoy the reality. Enjoy the reality show.

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