Epsilon rapidly intensified into a major hurricane on its way to Bermuda

Epsilon rapidly intensified into a major hurricane on its way to Bermuda

Epsilon rapidly strengthened into a major hurricane on its way to Bermuda and is now slowly weakening. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bermuda where tropical storm conditions are expected intermittently through this evening (AST).

  • According to the NHC, tropical storm conditions are expected intermittently on Bermuda through this evening (AST), when Epsilon is forecast to make its closest approach east of the island.
  • Dangerous and potentially life-threatening surf and rip currents are expected along the coasts of Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Greater Antilles, the Leeward Islands, the east coast of the United States, and Atlantic Canada during the next couple of days.

At 09:00 UTC on October 21, Epsilon's center was located about 415 km (260 miles) ESE of Bermuda. Its maximum sustained winds have decreased from 185 km/h (115 mph) to 175 km/h (110 mph) and additional weakening is forecast during the next few days.

Epsilon was moving NW at 11 km/h (7 mph) and had an estimated minimum central pressure of 955 hPa.

A turn toward the north-northwest is expected later today, followed by a northward motion tonight through Friday night, October 23, and an acceleration toward the northeast on Saturday.

On the forecast track, the center of Epsilon is forecast to make its closest approach to, but well to the east of, Bermuda later this evening (AST).

Large swells generated by Epsilon will affect Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Greater Antilles, the Leeward Islands, the east coast of the United States, and Atlantic Canada during the next few days. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Epsilon is expected to merge with a frontal zone and become extratropical by Tuesday, October 27.

Hurricane "Epsilon" at 10:10 UTC on October 22, 2020. Credit: NOAA/GOES-16, RAMMB/CIRA

Featured image: Hurricane "Epsilon" at 09:50 UTC on October 22, 2020. Credit: NOAA/GOES-16, RAMMB/CIRA

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