Moderate explosive eruption continues at Klyuchevskoy volcano, Russia

Moderate explosive eruption continues at Klyuchevskoy volcano, Russia

A moderate explosive eruption of the Strombolian and sometimes Vulcanian types continues at Russian Klyuchevskoy volcano. 

A notable eruption was registered at 00:05 UTC on April 9. Volcanic ash was ejected up to 7 km (23 000 feet) above sea level, drifting east, the Tokyo VAAC reported at 00:55 UTC. 

Ash emissions continued through 06:00 UTC when another similar eruption took place. Ash plume rose to the same height but this time it drifted to the south.

Both dissipated on satellite imagery by 11:20 UTC.

Remote sensing expert Antonio Vecoli aka Mr. SnapMan sent us this amazing image of the volcano, captured on April 9, 2020:

Image credit: Copernicus EU/Sentinel-2, Antonio Vecoli, Adam Platform. Acquired April 9, 2020

Ash explosions up to 5 - 7 km (16 400 - 23 000 feet) a.s.l. could occur at any time. Ongoing activity could affect low-flying aircraft.

Geological summary

Klyuchevskoy (also spelled Kliuchevskoi) is Kamchatka's highest and most active volcano. Since its origin about 6 000 years ago, the beautifully symmetrical, 4 835-m-high (15 862 feet) basaltic stratovolcano has produced frequent moderate-volume explosive and effusive eruptions without major periods of inactivity. It rises above a saddle NE of sharp-peaked Kamen volcano and lies SE of the broad Ushkovsky massif.

More than 100 flank eruptions have occurred during the past roughly 3 000 years, with most lateral craters and cones occurring along radial fissures between the unconfined NE-to-SE flanks of the conical volcano between 500 m and 3 600 m (1 640 - 11 811 feet) elevation.

The morphology of the 700-m-wide (2 296 feet) summit crater has been frequently modified by historical eruptions, which have been recorded since the late-17th century. Historical eruptions have originated primarily from the summit crater, but have also included numerous major explosive and effusive eruptions from flank craters. (GVP)

Featured image: Kyluchevskoy volcano on April 9, 2020. Credit: Copernicus EU/Sentinel-2, Antonio Vecoli, Adam Platform. Acquired April 9, 2020


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