Very large impacts may have stimulated blasts of plate tectonics

Very large impacts may have stimulated blasts of plate tectonics

A new study suggests that the Earth's evolution from a hot, primordial mush into a rocky planet continuously resurfaced by plate tectonics may be triggered by extraterrestrial impacts. By examining the implications of these processes, the researchers believe…

Research suggests major changes to geology textbooks

Research suggests major changes to geology textbooks

A new research of the Earth’s crust and upper-mantle suggests that ancient geologic events may have left deep ‘scars’ that can come to life to play a role in earthquakes, mountain formation, and other ongoing processes on our planet. This changes…

Collapse of Earth’s tectonic plates unravelled

Collapse of Earth’s tectonic plates unravelled

Following the international expedition drilling into the Pacific ocean floor, the scientists have for the first time discovered what happens after one tectonic plate gets pushed under another, Australian National University reports. During the drilling expeditions,…

First microplate discovered in the Indian Ocean reveals the age of Himalayas

First microplate discovered in the Indian Ocean reveals the age of Himalayas

The first ancient oceanic microplate has been discovered in the Indian Ocean by a team of Australian and US scientists. The discovery helped in identifying the timeline in which the initial collision between India and Eurasia has taken place, an event which gave…

A cause for plate collision discovered

A cause for plate collision discovered

An international team of 30 scientists has traveled to the Philippine Sea to drill into the crust of the Izu–Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and discover a cause for the plate collision. The results of their research were published in Nature Geoscience Journal on August 2

Study reveals how dust inside faults may contribute to earthquakes

Study reveals how dust inside faults may contribute to earthquakes

A new study looks at how powdery material inside faults may contribute to earthquakes. According to geologist Ze'ev Reches of the University of Oklahoma in Norman, US, the gradual buildup of stress in a fault as plates collide or slide past each other is