M6.0 earthquake hits Kermadec Islands

M6.0 earthquake hits Kermadec Islands

A strong earthquake registered by the USGS as M6.0 hit the Kermadec Islands at 10:45 UTC on January 26, 2023. The agency is reporting a depth of 135.7 km (84.3 miles). EMSC is reporting M5.6 at a depth of 100 km (62 miles).

Shallow M5.6 earthquake hits western Nepal, killing 1 person and injuring 2

Shallow M5.6 earthquake hits western Nepal, killing 1 person and injuring 2

At least one person was killed and two others were injured when an M5.6 earthquake hit the Bajura district in western Nepal at 08:58 UTC on Tuesday, January 25, 2023. The USGS registered it at a depth of 25 km (15 miles). EMSC is reporting M5.6 at a depth of 10 km (6.2 miles).

Decades-long growing rift in Brunt Ice Shelf finally breaks, creating new iceberg, Antarctica

Decades-long growing rift in Brunt Ice Shelf finally breaks, creating new iceberg, Antarctica

On January 22, 2023, a massive rift on the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica finally gave way, resulting in the formation of a new iceberg measuring 1 550 km2 (~600 mi2). The U.S. National Ice Center has named it Iceberg A-81. The rift, spanning most of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, appeared ready to spawn an iceberg in 2019, posing an uncertain future for scientific infrastructure and a human presence on the shelf that was first established in 1955 by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

Very deep M6.4 earthquake hits Santiago del Estero, Argentina

Very deep M6.4 earthquake hits Santiago del Estero, Argentina

A very deep earthquake registered by the USGS as M6.4 hit Santiago del Estero, Argentina at 18:37 UTC on January 24, 2023. The agency is reporting a depth of 601 km (373.4 miles). EMSC is reporting M6.1 at a depth of 584 km (362.9 miles).

Study provides the darkest and deepest view of interstellar ices

Study provides the darkest and deepest view of interstellar ices

An international team of scientists have used the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to study ices in interstellar clouds, providing new insights into the chemical processes of one of the coldest, darkest places in the universe. The study, published in Nature Astronomy, found that these ices are formed from the earliest moments of the universe and contain biogenic elements that are important for life.