Jurassic Coast sees biggest rockfall in 60 years, UK

Jurassic Coast sees biggest rockfall in 60 years, UK

A huge portion of a cliff along Dorset's Jurassic Coast in southern England, UK, has collapsed into the sea on Tuesday, April 13, 2021. It was the biggest rockfall in the area in 60 years, blocking a 300 m (984 feet) stretch of beach between Seatown and Eype, with more rock movements and falls expected.

Around 4 000 tonnes of a chunk of a cliff fell on Tuesday, blocking a 300 m (984 feet) stretch of a beach between Seatown and Eype. The collapse saw trees pulled out and thrown into the sea.

"There has been substantial rockfall between Seatown and Eype Beach. Further movement is expected with fresh cracks, affecting the fence line but not the Coast Path," the Dorset Council reported. 

"For your safety keep clear of tops and bases of cliffs when out and about."

The council has cordoned off large areas of the coastline after the initial rockfall caused several more landslides. It warned that more falls are expected as there are still rock movements. 

"The cliff is still very unstable and more is expected to be lost. Please take notice of safety signs."

Local media described the event as the area's biggest rockfall in 60 years.

In the last few months, numerous collapses have occurred in the region. In November 2019, a large rockfall hit Eype, while a part of the famous White Cliffs of Dover collapsed in February 2021.

The National Trust has warned that several of the UK's coastal regions are threatened by coastal erosion over the next four decades.

Student geologist Jodie Brewin told ITV, "Basically it's to do with re-weathering and erosion that basically falls hand-in-hand and shapes this coastline."

Featured image credit: Dorset Council UK


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