Roads washed away, dams critically high after drenching rain soaks North Carolina

Roads washed away, dams critically high after drenching rain soaks North Carolina

Over 228 mm (9 inches) of flooding rain fell in parts of eastern North Carolina on September 29, 2016, washing away roads and causing numerous water rescues.

The hardest hit was the city of Fayetteville in Cumberland County where 25 water rescues were performed and several roads closed after flooding overtook them.

The Lower Little River rose from its average height of 2.4 to 9.44 m (8 to 31 feet) - the highest recorded in decades, said Tad Davis, the town manager.

Spring lake gauges alert September 30, 2016

Red gauge: moderate flooding. September 30, 2016. Credit: NOAA

The Long Valley Farm Lake Dam at Carvers Creek State Park had a partial breach, and a full breach of the dam appeared imminent. The Fayetteville Observer reported that the partial breach was between 7.6 to 9.1 m (25 and 30 feet) wide and water flowed over the dam, which stretches 61 m (200 feet) across.

Officials report the neighborhood at greatest risk from the dam has already been evacuated.

A state of emergency is in effect in Cumberland County. Schools said classes are canceled on Friday, September 30.

About 2 000 Duke Energy customers were left without power.

Federal officials said late September 29 that three more dams are in danger after drenching rains soaked the region.

72 hours of rainfall accumulation ending 06:00 UTC on September 30, 2016. Fayetteville marked.

72 hours of rainfall accumulation ending 06:00 UTC on September 30, 2016. Credit: NASA/TRMM

Featured image: Roads washed away after 228 mm (9 inches) of rain in North Carolina. Credit: The News Journal (via Facebook)

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