·

Devastating supercell thunderstorm with fist sized hail hits Brisbane, Australia

devastating-supercell-thuderstorm-with-fist-sized-hail-hits-brisbane-australia

A devastating supercell storm hit Brisbane city, Australia late Thursday, November 27, 2014 with torrential rain, destructive wind speeds of about 140 km/h and giant widespread hail.

The storm made direct hit to central Brisbane making extraordinary damage and leaving more than 100 000 residents without power. Trees were uprooted, roads flooded, homes and cars severely damaged.

​Queensland state Premier Campbell Newman said it was the biggest storm that has hit Brisbane since 1985 but was grateful none of about 40 injured were seriously hurt.

The storm started as an ordinary cell south of Brisbane on Thursday afternoon and tracked north, encountering moist air from sea breezes that helped it develop into a supercell storm, the Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Pradeep Singh explained.

"A supercell has a vortex – the air is spinning around it as it moves up. When that happens, it takes the moisture above the freezing level and keeps it there for a long time," the senior meteorologist said. "Rain particles keep developing bigger and bigger into hail, and because the draft is so strong in supercells, they tend to stay for a long time up in the air and when they reach the right weight, they start dropping down." (CourierMail)

"There has been extraordinary damage across Brisbane, particularly also in the CBD," Transport Minister Scott Emerson said. "I think the damage bill will be more than $100 million [Australian dollars]," Emerson added.

Dr Richard Wardle, weather services manager with the Brisbane BOM, told AAP the storm was certainly at the upper end of thunderstorm strength. "Giant hail was widespread but what made this storm unusual was its direct hit on central Brisbane," he said. 

“We had hail that was up to tennis ball-size or softball size, and certainly golf ball-size for a large area.” 

The army has been deployed on Friday for a massive clean up operation.

Featured image: Supercell storm over Brisbane, Australia on November 27, 2014. Author: Troy Cassar-Daley (via Twitter)

If you value what we do here, create your ad-free account and support our journalism.

Share:


Your support makes a difference

Dear valued reader,

We hope that our website has been a valuable resource for you.

The reality is that it takes a lot of time, effort, and resources to maintain and grow this website. We rely on the support of readers like you to keep providing high-quality content.

If you have found our website to be helpful, please consider making a contribution to help us continue to bring you the information you need. Your support means the world to us and helps us to keep doing what we love.

Support us by choosing your support level – Silver, Gold or Platinum. Other support options include Patreon pledges and sending us a one-off payment using PayPal.

Thank you for your consideration. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Teo Blašković

$5 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$50 /year

$10 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$100 /year

$25 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$200 /year

You can also support us on Patreon

support us on patreon

or by sending us a one-off payment using PayPal:


Commenting rules and guidelines

We value the thoughts and opinions of our readers and welcome healthy discussions on our website. In order to maintain a respectful and positive community, we ask that all commenters follow these rules:

  • Treat others with kindness and respect.
  • Stay on topic and contribute to the conversation in a meaningful way.
  • Do not use abusive or hateful language.
  • Do not spam or promote unrelated products or services.
  • Do not post any personal information or content that is illegal, obscene, or otherwise inappropriate.

We reserve the right to remove any comments that violate these rules. By commenting on our website, you agree to abide by these guidelines. Thank you for helping to create a positive and welcoming environment for all.

One Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *