Moderately strong M2.0 solar flare erupted from Region 2146

Moderately strong M2.0 solar flare erupted from Region 2146

Moderately strong M2.0 solar flare erupted on August 25, 2014, from Active Region 2146 (beta). The event started at 14:46, peaked at 15:11 and ended at 15:31 UTC.

A Type II (707 km/s), IV and Tenflare (170 sfu) radio emissions were associated with this event. Type IV emissions occur in association with major eruptions on the sun and are typically associated with strong Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and solar radiation storms.

It is possible that part of the plasma cloud is directed toward our planet. More information will be available after the analysis.

NOAA SWPC forecasters estimate 50% chance for M-class, and 10% chance for X-class solar flare in next two days.

Space Weather Message Code: ALTTP4
Serial Number: 473
Issue Time: 2014 Aug 25 1539 UTC

ALERT: Type IV Radio Emission
Begin Time: 2014 Aug 25 1518 UTC
Description: Type IV emissions occur in association with major eruptions on the sun and are typically associated with strong coronal mass ejections and solar radiation storms.

***

Space Weather Message Code: ALTTP2
Serial Number: 955
Issue Time: 2014 Aug 25 1538 UTC

ALERT: Type II Radio Emission
Begin Time: 2014 Aug 25 1508 UTC
Estimated Velocity: 707 km/s
Description: Type II emissions occur in association with eruptions on the sun and typically indicate a coronal mass ejection is associated with a flare event.

***

Space Weather Message Code: SUM10R
Serial Number: 625
Issue Time: 2014 Aug 25 1530 UTC

SUMMARY: 10cm Radio Burst
Begin Time: 2014 Aug 25 1458 UTC
Maximum Time: 2014 Aug 25 1501 UTC
End Time: 2014 Aug 25 1503 UTC
Duration: 5 minutes
Peak Flux: 170 sfu
Latest Penticton Noon Flux: 141 sfu
Description: A 10cm radio burst indicates that the electromagnetic burst associated with a solar flare at the 10cm wavelength was double or greater than the initial 10cm radio background. This can be indicative of significant radio noise in association with a solar flare. This noise is generally short-lived but can cause interference for sensitive receivers including radar, GPS, and satellite communications.

Sunspots

There are currently 8 numbered sunspot regions on the disk. 

Region 2151 developed a small trailer spot during last 24 hours, but remained largely unchanged since the M5.9 flare yesterday.  Region 2146 (N10W39, Dki/beta) maintained its north-south spot orientation and was relatively dynamic during the same period, though unproductive. The other regions on the visible disk were either stable or in decay.

Sunspots on August 25, 2014. Image credit: NASA SDO/HMI

2141 - Alpha
2142 - Beta
2143 - Beta
2146 - Beta
2148 - Beta
2149 - Beta-Gamma-Delta
2150 - Alpha
2151 - Alpha

Geospace

The geomagnetic field was quiet in last 24 hours and is expected to remain quiet today and for the first half of August 26.  

Unsettled to active levels are expected after 12:00 UTC on August 26 through early August 27 due to the anticipated arrival of the August 22 CMEs. CME effects are expected to subside midday on August 27.

NOAA SWPC forecasters estimate a 15% to 20% chance of polar geomagetic storms on August 26 - 27 when the CME arrives.

Featured image: NASA SDO AIA 304

Tags: m-class

Comments

nick mamich 5 years ago

I have a 8kw photovoltaic grid tie system. It produced a power surge energy in the middle of the night 8/27 @ ~11PM EST; that surge was higher that any noon time peak power I ever had from my system. This solar flare was an amazing amount of power for it to cause my solar power system to product 120% power of mid day.

Post a comment

Your name: *

Your email address: *

Comment text: *

The image that appears on your comment is your Gravatar