Storm Evert to hit southern UK with unseasonably strong winds and heavy rain

Storm Evert to hit southern UK with unseasonably strong winds and heavy rain

A low pressure system approaching the United Kingdom on Thursday, July 29, 2021, has been named Storm Evert by the UK Met Office. This is the UK's first storm to be named in July.

  • The storm will bring some high winds, particularly along the northern coast of the southwest, but there will be gusty winds more widely in southern areas, which brings the potential for some impacts, especially for those that might be traveling or camping in the weather.
  • The arrival of a summer storm to the South West could take drivers and all holidaymakers in the region by surprise.
  • The sheer strength of the wind coupled with huge volumes of traffic will make driving conditions hazardous, particularly for those towing caravans and trailers.

While this is the first storm to be named in July by the Met Office's storm naming group with Met Éireann and KNMI, named summer storms aren't unprecedented, the office said in a statement released July 29. Two were named in August 2020, when Storm Ellen (August 19 - 20, 2020) and Storm Francis (August 25, 2020) moved into UK shores.

Coastal gales and rain are set to move into the southwestern UK this evening. High winds will then spread into other coastal counties in England on Thursday evening and Friday morning, July 30, before easing from the west later on Friday.

An amber wind warning has been issued for much of Cornwall, as well as the Isles of Scilly, with yellow warnings remaining in place for the wider southwest, southern Wales, and along the southern coast of England.

The highest winds are expected over parts of Cornwall during the early hours of Friday when gusts could reach as high as 120 km/h (75 mph) in the most exposed areas.

Other coastal areas in southern parts of England and Wales will also see high gusts, mainly between 65 and 95 km/h (40 and 60 mph), and this brings with it the chance for some travel disruption and damage to temporary structures.

The wettest weather on Thursday night will be over parts of Wales and southwest England, with the heaviest rain then moving eastwards on Friday as parts of eastern, southern, and central England then get the wettest weather, including risk of thunderstorms in a few places during the afternoon.  

"Storm Evert will bring some high winds, particularly along the northern coast of the southwest, but there will be gusty winds more widely in southern areas, which brings the potential for some impacts, especially for those that might be traveling or camping in the weather," Met Office Principal Operational Meteorologist Dan Suri said.

Evert will also bring some heavy rain, with up to 40 mm (1.5 inches) possible over parts of Wales and the southwest and the potential for 40 to 50 mm (1.5 - 1.9 inches) rain in a short period of time.

"The arrival of a summer storm to the South West could take drivers – and indeed all holidaymakers in the region – by surprise," said RAC Breakdown spokesman Rod Dennis.

"The sheer strength of the wind coupled with huge volumes of traffic will make driving conditions hazardous, particularly for those towing caravans and trailers."

"We strongly recommend drivers check over their vehicles before setting out – ensuring roofboxes are firmly secured – and try to avoid exposed coastal and moorland routes where the impacts of the wind on driving will be the greatest. Drivers should reduce their speeds accordingly to help ensure they complete their journeys safely."

Featured image credit: EUMETSAT/Meteosat-11. Acquired at 12:30 UTC on July 29, 2021


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