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A giant rock avalanche recorded in the Swiss Alps

a-giant-rock-avalanche-recorded-in-the-swiss-alps

A giant rock broke off the side of the Mel de la Niva mountain, near Evolene region in the Swiss Alps on October 19, 2015.

A geologists who was taking video shots near the area witnessed the fall and documented it on a footage. The 2 000 cubic meters (70 269 cubic feet) of rock rock was falling for more than 300 m (about 1 000 feet) and triggered an avalanche, media reported.

Video credit: Editions Le Nouvelliste

Unusual geological activity has been noticed by the scientists two years ago, and the area was monitored since. Last week some strong movement was observed and the road below the mountain was swiftly evacuated. Thanks to the prompt reaction, no injuries have been reported as the area has been evacuated on time.

Locals have reported a loud noise following the rock and debris on its tumble down the mountain.

Featured image: A rock breaking off the Mel de la Niva mountain, Swiss Alps, October 19, 2015. Image credit: Le Nouvelliste

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One Comment

  1. In Germany I learned in school that the Alps are a “Falten Gebirge’, which means that earth was pushed together and folded in an upward manner. Some plates must have been pushing together to create maybe more of this. Such a huge size rock falling sounds scary.

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