·

New eruption forms lava lake in summit crater of Nyamuragira volcano, DR Congo

new-eruption-forms-lava-lake-in-summit-crater-of-nyamuragira-volcano-dr-congo

A new eruption is occurring at Nyamuragira volcano, DR Congo. A lava lake has appeared in the main pit inside its summit caldera, but so far, reports of lava flows (presumably from flank vents) on the northern slope of Nyamuragira could not be verified, VolcanoDiscovery reports.

A recent Landsat satellite image shows the new lava lake, and thermal anomalies as well as increased SO2 concentrations above the close-by Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira have been detected over the past days. Both volcanoes are located just north of the Congolese city of Goma, near the border with Rwanda.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the USGS Earth Explorer. Date acquired June 30, 2014.

The false-color image combines shortwave-infrared, near-infrared, and green light as red, green, and blue, respectively. Shortwave- and near- infrared light penetrates hazy skies better than visible light, so more surface detail is visible in this image than would be in natural-color. Because very hot surfaces glow in shortwave-infrared, the lava lakes within the summit craters of Nyamuragira and Nyiragongo appear bright red. The dark lava flows spreading from Nyamuragira were erupted within the past 50 years, some as recently as 2012. Vegetation is bright green.

Geologic summary

Africa's most active volcano, Nyamuragira is a massive high-potassium basaltic shield volcano that rises about 25 km north of Lake Kivu, NW of Nyiragongo volcano. Nyamuragira, also known as Nyamulagira, has a volume of 500 cu km, and extensive lava flows from the volcano blanket 1500 sq km of the western branch of the East African Rift. The broad low-angle shield volcano contrasts dramatically with its steep-sided neighbor Nyiragongo. The 3058-m-high summit of Nyamuragira is truncated by a small 2 x 2.3 km caldera that has walls up to about 100 m high.

Historical eruptions have occurred within the summit caldera, frequently modifying the morphology of the caldera floor, as well as from the numerous fissures and cinder cones on the volcano's flanks. A lava lake in the summit crater, active since at least 1921, drained in 1938, at the time of a major flank eruption. Historical lava flows extend down the flanks more than 30 km from the summit, reaching as far as Lake Kivu. (GVP)

Featured image: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the USGS Earth Explorer.

If you value what we do here, create your ad-free account and support our journalism.

Share:

Related articles



Your support makes a difference

Dear valued reader,

We hope that our website has been a valuable resource for you.

The reality is that it takes a lot of time, effort, and resources to maintain and grow this website. We rely on the support of readers like you to keep providing high-quality content.

If you have found our website to be helpful, please consider making a contribution to help us continue to bring you the information you need. Your support means the world to us and helps us to keep doing what we love.

Support us by choosing your support level – Silver, Gold or Platinum. Other support options include Patreon pledges and sending us a one-off payment using PayPal.

Thank you for your consideration. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Teo Blašković

$5 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$50 /year

$10 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$100 /year

$25 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$200 /year

You can also support us on Patreon

support us on patreon

or by sending us a one-off payment using PayPal:


Commenting rules and guidelines

We value the thoughts and opinions of our readers and welcome healthy discussions on our website. In order to maintain a respectful and positive community, we ask that all commenters follow these rules:

  • Treat others with kindness and respect.
  • Stay on topic and contribute to the conversation in a meaningful way.
  • Do not use abusive or hateful language.
  • Do not spam or promote unrelated products or services.
  • Do not post any personal information or content that is illegal, obscene, or otherwise inappropriate.

We reserve the right to remove any comments that violate these rules. By commenting on our website, you agree to abide by these guidelines. Thank you for helping to create a positive and welcoming environment for all.

2 Comments

  1. It was very nice to see the NASA Landsat image with new lava lake in the summit crater of Nyamulagira. For now at Goma Volcano Observatory we are analysing the seismic evidence which conducted to that situation. But for now, the glow desparied after one month of its visibility by the Goma inhabitants. How to interpret that situation?, can we continou to confirm the lava lake in the summit of that volcano?

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *