Cape Town dam levels increase by 9.2 percent after back-to-back cold fronts, South Africa

Cape Town dam levels increase by 9.2 percent after back-to-back cold fronts, South Africa

Heavy rains brought by back-to-back cold fronts over the past few days have resulted in a 9.2 percent increase of dam levels in Cape Town, South Africa, in just one week-- according to the reading released by city officials for July 13, 2020. 

"The dams in and around Cape Town form part of the Western Cape Water Supply System, which is an integrated and collectively managed system of dams, pump stations, pipelines, and tunnels. In addition to servicing Cape Town, the system supplies water to towns in the Overberg, Boland, West Coast, and Swartland areas, and provides irrigation water for agriculture," the City of Cape Town said.

The fullest levels were Steenbras Upper at 101.3 percent and Berg River at 93.8. According to the officials, dam levels have risen by 9.2 percent this past week. The dams have now reached 72.7 percent capacity.

At the same time in 2017, dams were at 25.7 percent when the water crisis hit its peak.

cape-town-dam-july-13-2020

Image credit: City of Cape Town

The South African Weather Service issued multiple warnings of wet conditions and gale force winds last week, with the Western Cape coastlines seeing massive swells. It also produced foams in Sea Point on Cape Town's Atlantic seaboard on Monday.

After a wet start to the week, Cape Town residents can expect mild, sunny, and clear weather from Wednesday, July 15.

Featured image: Berg River Dam in September 2018. Credit: City of Cape Town

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