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Central and South Texas in danger of more flooding

central-and-south-texas-in-danger-of-more-flooding

The National Weather Service (NWS) warns that portions of Central and South Texas are possibly in danger of more flooding. A flood warning has been issued for the area, as up to 127 mm (5 inches) of rain are expected this Saturday, May 30 if the storm system stalls over the area.

Between 25.4 and 50.8 mm (1 and 2 inches) of rain are expected in the greater Houston area, according to NWS Houston Lead Forecaster Scott Overpeck.

He warns that the already-waterlogged area might receive between 101.6 and 127 mm (4 and 5 inches) in only few hours, as the storm is most likely slow-moving. This additional rainfall could cause more floods along the Brazos River.

A flash flood warning has been issued for the Dallas area where rivers are all swelled from the last week. The NWS reported 408.178 mm (16.07 inches) of rain fell across the Dallas area this May, breaking the 1982 record of 346.964 mm (13.66 inches).

This May's storms have already resulted in at least 29 deaths, 25 of them in Texas with at least 11 people still missing in the area.

President Barack Obama has signed a disaster declaration for Texas and ordered additional federal aid to supplement other recovery efforts in the area.

The Governor of Texas, Greg Abbott earlier requested a presidential disaster declaration in order to get federal aid for the counties affected.

"Communities across the state of Texas have experienced devastating destruction, injury and — most tragically — loss of life due to the major and unceasing severe weather system that has been impacting our state for weeks," Abbott said.

"I am extremely proud of the way that our first responders, local officials, law enforcement and Texas citizens have come together to protect and support one another in this time of crisis. I am requesting disaster assistance from the federal government to ensure that families, businesses and communities who have experienced hardship as a result of these severe storms have access to all possible resources as they recover and rebuild."

Funding aid is also available to governments and some nonprofits on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and repairs in Cooke, Gaines, Grimes, Harris, Hays, Navarro, and Van Zandt counties.

Featured image: Downtown Houston flooding on May 25, 2015. Credit: Texan Gent ‏@TexanGentsCode

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