Toxic gases released from Kawah Ijen injure 24 people, evacuations ordered

toxic-gases-released-from-kawah-ijen-injure-24-people-evacuations-ordered

Kawah Ijen volcano located in the Ijen volcano complex at the eastern end of Java, Indonesia, released toxic gases on March 21, 2018, injuring 24 people. The incident started around 19:00 local time and peaked around 21:00.

Authorities said 30 people were exposed to gas and 24 of them sent to local hospitals.

One of the locals said that residents living in 3 hamlets close to the crater (Margahayu Hamlet, Watu Capil and Dusun Curah Macan), have been evacuated to Puskemas Kecamaten Ijen. 

The volcanic alert level remains normal at this time but the crater has been closed due to toxic fumes.

Kawah Ijen sulfur miners

Sulfur miners (left) extract elemental sulfur from the crater walls of Kawah Ijen. Large baskets of sulfur are carried laboriously up to the crater rim and down its flanks. The sulfur factory is located at Jambu, on the SE flank above Banyuwangi. Photo by Tom Casadevall, 1987. Credit: U.S. Geological Survey

Geological summary

The Ijen volcano complex at the eastern end of Java consists of a group of small stratovolcanoes constructed within the large 20-km-wide (12.4 miles) Ijen (Kendeng) caldera.

The north caldera wall forms a prominent arcuate ridge, but elsewhere the caldera rim is buried by post-caldera volcanoes, including Gunung Merapi, which forms the high point of the complex. Immediately west of the Gunung Merapi stratovolcano is the historically active Kawah Ijen crater, which contains a nearly 1-km-wide (0.62 miles), turquoise-colored, acid lake.

Picturesque Kawah Ijen is the world's largest highly acidic lake and is the site of a labor-intensive sulfur mining operation in which sulfur-laden baskets are hand-carried from the crater floor. Many other post-caldera cones and craters are located within the caldera or along its rim.

The largest concentration of cones forms an E-W zone across the southern side of the caldera. Coffee plantations cover much of the caldera floor, and tourists are drawn to its waterfalls, hot springs, and volcanic scenery.

Featured image: Kawah Ijeh crater lake. Credit: USGS, Tom Casadevall, 1987

If you value what we do here, create your ad-free account and support our journalism.

Share:

Related articles



Your support makes a difference

Dear valued reader,

We hope that our website has been a valuable resource for you.

The reality is that it takes a lot of time, effort, and resources to maintain and grow this website. We rely on the support of readers like you to keep providing high-quality content.

If you have found our website to be helpful, please consider making a contribution to help us continue to bring you the information you need. Your support means the world to us and helps us to keep doing what we love.

Support us by choosing your support level – Silver, Gold or Platinum. Other support options include Patreon pledges and sending us a one-off payment using PayPal.

Thank you for your consideration. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Teo Blašković

$5 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$50 /year

$10 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$100 /year

$25 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Clean user interface and fast browsing
  • Direct communication with us via chat and email
  • Suggest new features, content and applications
  • Early access to new apps and features

$200 /year

You can also support us on Patreon

support us on patreon

or by sending us a one-off payment using PayPal:


Commenting rules and guidelines

We value the thoughts and opinions of our readers and welcome healthy discussions on our website. In order to maintain a respectful and positive community, we ask that all commenters follow these rules:

  • Treat others with kindness and respect.
  • Stay on topic and contribute to the conversation in a meaningful way.
  • Do not use abusive or hateful language.
  • Do not spam or promote unrelated products or services.
  • Do not post any personal information or content that is illegal, obscene, or otherwise inappropriate.

We reserve the right to remove any comments that violate these rules. By commenting on our website, you agree to abide by these guidelines. Thank you for helping to create a positive and welcoming environment for all.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *