·

Tropical Storm “Andres” forms and becomes first named storm of 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season

tropical-storm-andres-forms-and-becomes-first-named-storm-of-2015-eastern-pacific-hurricane-season

Tropical Storm "Andres" formed on May 28, 2015 about 1 100 km (690 miles) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico and became the first named storm of the 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season. The storm is expected to intensify, but stay far off the coast of Mexico.

Andres formed some two weeks after the official start of the 2015 season (May 15 – November 30) which is expected to be above-normal, mainly due to intensifying El Niño conditions. 

According to NWS NHC Miami advisory issued at 09:00 UTC on May 29, the center of the storm was located about 1 285 km (795 miles) SSW of the southern tip of Baja California.

At the time, it's maximum sustained winds were 110 km/h (70 mph). 

The system was moving to the WNW at 15 km/h (9 mph).

Minimum central pressure was 994 hPa.

Some strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours, and Andres is expected to become a hurricane later today.

Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 km (115 miles) from the center.

Tropical Storm "Andres" on May 28, 2015. Image credit: NASA Terra/MODIS.

Satellite animations

Above-normal Eastern Pacific hurricane season expected

NOAA's 2015 Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season Outlook indicates that an above-normal season is most likely, with a 70% chance of an above-normal season, a 25% chance of a near-normal season, and only a 5% chance of a below normal season.

The main climate factor expected to enhance the 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season is El Niño, which is now present and is predicted to last throughout the hurricane season.

Many models predict this El Niño to strengthen further as the season progresses.

El Niño decreases the vertical wind shear over the eastern tropical Pacific, which favors more and stronger tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño is already affecting the wind and rainfall patterns across the equatorial and subtropical Pacific Ocean.

Also, the sea surface temperatures patterns that have been associated with decreased hurricane activity in the eastern Pacific since 1995 are not expected during the 2015 season, and are therefore not expected to compete with El Niño's conducive wind patterns.

For the 2015 hurricane season, NOAA estimates a 70% chance of occurrence for each of the following ranges of activity:

  • 15 – 22 named storms,
  • 7 – 12 hurricanes,
  • 5 – 8 major hurricanes,
  • An ACE range 110%-190% of the median.

Featured image: Tropical Storm "Andres" on May 28, 2015. Image credit: NASA Terra/MODIS.

If you value what we do here, create your ad-free account and support our journalism.

Share:

Producing content you read on this website takes a lot of time, effort, and hard work. If you value what we do here, select the level of your support and register your account.

Your support makes this project fully self-sustainable and keeps us independent and focused on the content we love to create and share.

All our supporters can browse the website without ads, allowing much faster speeds and a clean interface. Your comments will be instantly approved and you’ll have a direct line of communication with us from within your account dashboard. You can suggest new features and apps and you’ll be able to use them before they go live.

You can choose the level of your support.

Stay kind, vigilant and ready!

$5 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Instant comments
  • Direct communication
  • New features and apps suggestions
  • Early access to new apps and features

$50 /year

$10 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Instant comments
  • Direct communication
  • New features and apps suggestions
  • Early access to new apps and features

$100 /year

$25 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Instant comments
  • Direct communication
  • New features and apps suggestions
  • Early access to new apps and features

$200 /year

You can also support us by sending us a one-off payment using PayPal:

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.