National Observatory of Athens registers highest temperature on record, Greece

greece-sets-new-european-all-time-highest-temperature-record-august-2021

Greek National Observatory of Athens (NOA) has registered its highest temperature on record with 46.3 °C (115.3 °F) registered in Makrakomi, Phthiotis on Monday, August 2, 2021.

Other Greek mainland areas also recorded extremely high temperatures on Monday, with 45 °C (113 °F) registered in Debra, 44.9 °C (112.8 °F) in Larissa, 44.7 °C (112.4 °F) in Sparta, 44.4 °C (111.9 °F) in Lefkochori and 44 °C (111.2 °F) in Thebes.

On the same day, the maximum temperature in the capital Athens reached 42 °C (107.6 °F).

"Greece held 5 highest temperatures in Europe on Monday," said Giannis Kallianos, an MP and meteorologist for Greece’s MEGA TV channel.

"Makrakomi, Larissa, and Sparta were the three hottest towns and cities in Europe, followed by two more Greek urban areas — Lefkochori in Phthiotis and the city of Thebes," Kallianos said.

Due to high temperatures expected to continue through the rest of the week, the Ministry of Culture and Sports announced the closure of open-air archeological sites across the country between 12:00 and 17:00 through August 5.

In addition to high risk to the population, Greek authorities said there's a risk of power outages due to excessive consumption.

The country has already broken its electricity consumption record on Monday afternoon, with 11 000 megawatts demanded at the one point, and authorities fear the record might fall again before the end of the week.

All citizens were asked to limit demand for electricity, especially during peak hours.

Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said Greece is hit by its worst heatwave since 1987 when the country recorded more than 1 000 heat-related deaths. 

Featured image credit: GFS, TropicalTidbits

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5 Comments

  1. On July 10, 1977, the Elefsina and Tatoi suburbs of Athens recorded a temperature of 48.0 °C (118.4 °F)—the highest temperature ever recorded in Europe by the World Meteorological Organization. (337 ppm, CO₂ – 1977)

  2. What about areas reaching all-time lows for this time of year? Such as in Brazil, and other areas. Time to focus on the magnetic poles preparing to flip so people can plan and prepare, and NOT just those in high places. It will be bigger than even the last reversal that switched the pole star at that time ‘Thuban’ to Polaris. This time the switch will be from Polaris to the star ‘Vega’.

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