Very strong and shallow M7.4 earthquake hits Oaxaca, Mexico

Very strong and shallow M7.4 earthquake hits Oaxaca, Mexico

A very strong and shallow earthquake registered by the USGS as M7.4 hit Oaxaca, Mexico at 15:29 UTC on June 23, 2020, at a depth of 26.3 km (14.6 miles). EMSC is reporting M7.4 at a depth of 10 km (6.2 miles).

The epicenter was located 11.9 km (7.4 miles) SSW of Santa María Zapotitlán (population 1 104), 38.1 km (23.6 miles) NE of Crucecita (population 15 130), 67.7 km (42 miles) ENE of San Pedro Pochutla (population 13 685), 78.1 km (48.4 miles) WSW of Salina Cruz (population 76 596), and 143.4 km (88.9 miles) SE of Oaxaca (population 255 029), Oaxaca, Mexico.

There are about 640 000 people living within 100 km (62 miles), 270 000 within 75 km (46 miles), 89 000 within 50 km (31 miles), and 13 000 within 20 km (12 miles).

Based on all available data, hazardous tsunami waves are forecast for some coasts, PTWC said.

Tsunami waves reaching 1 to 3 m (3.3 - 9.8 feet) above the tide level are possible along some coasts of Mexico. Tsunami waves are forecast to be less than 0.3 m (1 foot) above the tide level for the coasts of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Hawaii, Honduras, Jarvis Island, Kiribati, Nicaragua, Palmyra Island, Panama and Peru, PTWC said at 16:04 UTC.

Actual amplitudes at the coast may vary from forecast amplitudes due to uncertainties in the forecast and local features. In particular maximum tsunami amplitudes on atolls and at locations with fringing or barrier reefs will likely be much smaller than the forecast indicates, the center added.

Location of M7.4 earthquake in Oaxaca, Mexico on June 23, 2020. Credit: Google, TW/SAM

Location of M7.4 earthquake in Oaxaca, Mexico on June 23, 2020. Credit: Google, TW/SAM

The USGS issued a yellow alert for shaking-related fatalities and economic losses. Some casualties and damage are possible and the impact should be relatively localized. Past yellow alerts have required a local or regional level response.

Estimated economic losses are less than 1% of GDP of Mexico.

Recent earthquakes in this area have caused secondary hazards such as tsunamis and landslides that might have contributed to losses.

Landslides triggered by this earthquake are estimated to be significant in number and (or) spatial extent.

Liquefaction is estimated to be limited in severity and (or) spatial extent.

There are reports of heavy damage in Oaxaca and CDMX.

At least 1 person has lost its life due to landslide in Huatulco. An unknown number of people have been injured.

Reports from capital mention at least one collapsed house with no injuries.

Hundreds of people have fled their homes.

More than 440 aftershocks were reported by the end of the day.

The state-owned petroleum company Pemex confirmed one of its oil refineries burst into flames, injuring one man who later died in a hospital.

Reports on June 24 mention at least 5 casualties.

Estimated population exposure to earthquake shaking

Selected cities exposed

Regional seismicity

Multimedia

Featured image credit: Google, TW/SAM

Comments

Mel 3 months ago

Jamal. I've been reading your work and it is quite interesting although I cannot fully follow you on physics yet why a company or nation would want to build an artificial sun? And still none has come with a solid explanation why we have earthquakes on specific places

Jamal Shrair 3 months ago

THE SUPREME GOD OF PHYSICS CAN NEVER BE WRONG..................................................On June 18, 2020, I published on Linkedin and the facebook of my website the following THE SOLSTICE SOLAR ECLIPSE ON JUNE 21 AND THE HIGH PROBABILITY FOR MASSIVE EARTHQUAKE TWO DAYS LATER https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/solstice-solar-eclipse-june-21-high-probability-massive-jamal-shrair/?published=t.................................................I CAN PROVIDE THE KNOW HOW TO ANY COMPANY OR A NATION THAT WANTS TO BUILD AN ARTIFICIAL SUN

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