Japan earthquake: At least 37 killed or missing after powerful M6.7 quake hits Hokkaido

Japan earthquake: At least 37 killed or missing after powerful M6.7 quake hits Hokkaido

At least 7 people were killed and more than 30 others are still missing and feared dead after a powerful M6.7 earthquake hit Hokkaido, Japan at 18:07 UTC on September 5 (03:07 JST, September 6). JMA says the earthquake measured 7 on the Japanese seismic intensity scale, the strongest possible level. Dozens of aftershocks were recorded.

The quake triggered over 800 landslides, caused widespread damage and left the entire Hokkaido Prefecture without power after the Tomato Atsuma thermal power plant in the city of Sunagawa stopped working. The massive power outage affected 2.95 million customers.

A large number of homes were wiped out in Atsuma, near the epicenter, leaving more than 30 people missing. Rescue workers are frantically searching for people buried in the rubble, NHK reports

"In areas where shaking was strong, the danger of houses collapsing and landslides could be very high. Pay attention to upcoming seismic activity and rainfall. Don't come into dangerous areas unless it's necessary and be careful to look out for your own safety," JMA's Toshiyuki Matsumori said.

Aviation authorities canceled all flights at Hokkaido's New Chitose Airport and local trains have stopped. Public bus services have also shut down and many highways have closed. Schools are also closed for the day, NHK said.

The extent of the damage is still being assessed but throughout the prefecture, buildings are tilted and roads are cracked and buckled.

Update:

Saturday, September 8

A total of 21 people have been confirmed dead, six others in state of cardiopulmonary arrest, and 13 people remain missing in the wake of a powerful earthquake that rocked Hokkaido Prefecture in northern Japan on Thursday, Japanese government said on Saturday.

A total of 40 000 people, including local police, firefighters, Self-Defense Force personnel and Japan Coast Guard, are searching for the missing and helping the disaster-hit areas.

Featured image credit: Kyodo


Keep us going strong - subscribe today and get your ad-free account 

Producing content you read on this website takes a lot of time, effort, and hard work. If you value what we do here, please consider subscribing today.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY


Comments

No comments yet. Why don't you post the first comment?

Post a comment

Your name: *

Your email address: *

Comment text: *

The image that appears on your comment is your Gravatar