The one-in-a-hundred years flooding wreaks havoc in France

The one-in-a-hundred years flooding wreaks havoc in France

Torrential downpours have been reported across portions of France over the last couple of days. The Seine-et-Marne and Loiret departments saw 20 days worth of rain over the last 72 hours, and red flood alerts were put in effect on June 1, 2016. Meteo France issued orange alerts for Cher, Indre, Indre-etLoir, Loir-et-Cher, Meuse, Meurthe-et-Moselle, and Moselle at the same time. 

Severe weather conditions have wreaked havoc across parts of western Europe, including Germany and France, since May 28, 2016. Heavy rainfalls have caused the rivers to swell and triggered massive, widespread flooding and deadly thunderstorms that killed several people and injured over 35 across the affected areas. Forecasters predicted the outbreak would last until May 31. However, the consequences will surely be felt for some time afterward.

The wettest May since 1873 was recorded in Paris this season. The Seine River rose for 3.82 m (12.53 feet) on May 31 and was expected to pass 4.3 (14.1 feet) before subsiding. However, on June 1, the waters rose for another 40 cm (1.3 feet), threatening to reach 5 m (16.4 feet). Numerous river banks closed downed for public on May 31, due to the risk of the flood of the century event, as only July 2001 reported more precipitation than May 2016, in the history of records.

72-hr rainfall as observed by the GPM Core Observatory. Image credit: Google/NASA/JAXA/GPM

Over 70 mm (2.75 inches) of rainfall was observed at Bruay-la-Buisserie in Pas-de-Calais. The local town of 23 000 residents was protected from the flooding by the dam.

Flood in Loiret on June 1, 2016. Image credit: Ax Rml via Meteo Europe

Flood in Loiret, June 1, 2016. Image credit: Ax Rml via Meteo Europe

All schools have been closed down in the Loiret, as the river Loing overflowed its banks. The authorities in Montargis were forced to evacuate 59 patients of the local clinic after the town was ravaged by the worst reported flooding since 1910. Schools have been closed down in the Loiret, as well, after the Loing river overflowed its banks. Towns and settlements situated along the rivers Orne and Sauldre are currently at risk, too.

The flooding blocked 47 roads in the Yonne while the other 71 are immersed in the water, as well, but can be passed with extreme caution. 200 motorists got trapped by the flooding waters on the A10 road close to Orléans. The army performed a successful rescue operation on the occasion.

Video credit: Euronews.com

Meteorologists in Belgium reported 45 days worth of rainfall in only 24 hours along the borderline with France on May 31. Over 8 000 rescue operations were conducted from the Belgian border south to Burgundy over the last two days, according to Bernard Cazeneuve, the Interior Minister.

The heavy rainfall is expected to continue throughout June 2. Meteo France warned the people to avoid traveling in the areas of Seine-et-Marne and Loiret. Residents of the most severely affected areas should exercise caution and ensure they have enough fresh water supplies available. Vehicle drivers have been urged to take precaution measures and refrain from driving along the flooded roads, as strong currents are capable of sweeping away the vehicles, despite appearing harmless.

Featured image credit: Euronews.com

Register/become a supporter

Support us AD-FREE

Your support is crucial for our survival. It makes this project fully self-sustainable and keeps us independent and focused on the content we love to create and share. 

Monthly subscription

Subscription options

Yearly subscription

Subscription options

You'll receive your ad-free account for 20x faster browsing experience, clean interface without any distractions, ability to post comments without prior editorial check, all our desktop and mobile applications (current and upcoming) ad-free and with the full set of features available, a direct line of communication and much more. See all options.

Comments

Fred 2 years ago

While France's rainfall levels in May were the highest since 1873, the current crisis is eclipsed by the 1910 floods that saw Paris submerged for two months, when the Zouave was up to his neck in the Seine.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-36446635

The river level peaked at 8.62m that year, and has since reached 7.1m in 1955 and 6.18m in 1982

John Berbatis 2 years ago

The reason there are climate change skeptics is because they still have access to adequate supply of nutritious food and potable water. But after four days of being deprived of these essentials, they may consider the reality of the situation. Famine was the incentive for many social revolutions in the past and history will repeat itself.

Post a comment

Your name: *

Your email address: *

Comment text: *

The image that appears on your comment is your Gravatar