CH HSS sparks G2 – Moderate geomagnetic storm

ch-hss-sparks-g2-moderate-geomagnetic-storm

Our planet entered a stream of fast-moving solar wind on January 18, 2022, sparking G2 – Moderate geomagnetic storm. A slightly enhanced solar wind environment is anticipated today as CH HSS effects taper, followed by a minor enhancement due to glancing blow effects from the January 16 CME.

Solar wind parameters in 24 hours to 00:30 UTC on January 19 reflected persistent Coronal Hole High Speed Stream (CH HSS) influence.1

However, wind speed values were unreliable due to faraday cup issues on the DSCOVR spacecraft.

Total field values reached 7 nT, Bz dropped as low as -5 nT while Phi was predominately negative.

Geomagnetic K-Index of 6 (G2 – Moderate geomagnetic storm) threshold was reached at 02:59 UTC on January 19.

A slightly enhanced solar wind environment is anticipated today as CH HSS effects taper, followed by a minor enhancement due to glancing blow effects from the January 16 Coronal Mass Ejection (CME).

Solar activity was moderate during the same period.

Region 2929 (N07W58, Dko/beta) produced the largest event of the period, an M1.5 flare at 17:44 UTC with an associated Type IV and Type II (estimated velocity 143 km/s) radio emissions. It was a partial halo CME with no clear Earth-directed component.

Region 2929 displayed intermediate spot decay and was responsible for the majority of the significant flaring throughout the period.

Region 2927 (S20W53, Hsx/alpha) was unchanged and quiet.

Region 2930 (N21W59, Dao/beta) showed signs of leader consolidation and produced a C5.7 flare at 19:51 UTC.

Region 2933 (S22W22, Cso/beta) underwent slight decay in its trailer and produced low-level B-class activity.

Region 2932 (N32, L=245) decayed to plage.

Solar activity is likely to be low through January 21, with a slight chance for M-class flares, R1 – R2 (Minor-Moderate) radio blackouts, due to the flare history of Region 2929.

Reference:

1 Forecast Discussion Issued: 2022 Jan 19 0030 UTC – Prepared by the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center

Featured image credit: NOAA/SWPC

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