Snow and below freezing temperatures a day after very heavy rains and widespread floods, UK

Snow and below freezing temperatures a day after very heavy rains and widespread floods, UK

Snow has pummelled parts of Wales on November 9, 2019, causing travel disruptions just a day after a heavy downpour hit parts of England, resulting in widespread floods. One woman reportedly died after being swept away by floodwater in Derbyshire.

Temperatures have dropped to -7 °C (19.4 °F) in parts of Scotland. Seven severe flood warnings remain in place in England, with one yellow warning for ice across the east of Northern Ireland.

The snow came a day after deadly flooding ravaged parts of Britain, killing one woman identified as Annie Hall. Her body was retrieved from the Derwent River on Friday, November 8.

North Wales Police warned dangerous conditions on the A470 Bwlch Oerddrws in Gwynedd. The A542 Horseshoe Pass near Llangollen was also closed.

The heavy snow blanketed areas in Snowdonia, Wrexham, and Mold.

Two football matches in the Cymru Premier were canceled due to the weather.

A massive cleanup operation is now being carried out as some residential areas are still submerged.

Sleet, a mix of rain and snow, hit coastal areas near Cardiff as North Wales and inland was covered in snow.

Rail operator issued a "do not travel" advice for passengers, using five lines on its network-- lines between Sheffield and Gainsborough, Sheffield and Lincoln, Sheffield and Goole, Hebden Bridge and Rochdale, and the line from Sheffield to Leeds via Moorthorpe.

Residents from over 400 homes in Doncaster, South Yorkshire were displaced as the entire streets were deluged in flood.

Overall, low temperatures are expected across the UK, with some portions of Scotland experiencing below freezing point.

Patches of fog with westerly rain are predicted by the Met Office. Downpours should head eastwards but are likely to avoid the areas affected by floods.

The highest rainfall recorded on November 8 was in Swineshaw, in the district of Peak, with 112 mm (4 inches) in a 24-hour period.

Featured image credit: Cefn Druids AFC

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