1 billion years of Moon impacts converted into music

1 billion years of Moon impacts converted into music

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Scientists have recently been able to determine the age of 111 of the Moon's larger impact craters that are younger than about 1 billion years. Here you can listen to these impacts occur within 1 minute with larger craters producing louder and deeper notes.

The craters were dated by studying how fast the ejected material cools during the lunar nighttime. The debris from older craters has crumbled more over time and the smaller pieces are able to cool very fast. Younger craters are still surrounded by ejected boulders which stay warmer for longer.

Surprisingly, the data shows that lunar impacts became more frequent about 290 million years ago. This indicates that the Earth likely also faced a greater rate of impacts at that time, although many of the impact craters have long disappeared. 

The sustained cello-like drone in the background is created by converting the elevation of the Moon's entire surface directly into a sound wave: 

For more info visit system-sounds.com/moon-impacts system-sounds.com
Created by Matt Russo, Andrew Santaguida, and Dan Tamayo
Data: Mazrouei et al (Science 2019) http://science.sciencemag.org/content...

Featured image credit: SYSTEM Sounds

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