· ·

Study of Deer Mice on California’s Channel Islands provides new information on Hantavirus

study-of-deer-mice-on-californias-channel-islands-provides-new-information-on-hantavirus

The researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison studied wild deer mouse populations on the Channel Islands off the southern coast of California. The mice carry a variant of hantavirus – a disease spread by rodents – called Sin Nombre virus. Results of the study appear in the May issue of the journal American Naturalist.

They show that just three ecological factors – rainfall, predator diversity and island size and shape–can account for nearly all the differences in infection rates between the eight islands. The study also provides some of the first evidence to support a recent hypothesis that predators play an important ecological role in regulating disease – sometimes known as the “predators are good for your health” hypothesis.

In humans, Sin Nombre virus causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, a virulent and often fatal disease. An outbreak of Sin Nombre virus in 1993 in the Four Corners area of the U.S. Southwest killed several people and brought national attention to the disease. Learning what factors control the prevalence and spread of viruses like Sin Nombre within host populations is crucial for understanding the risks of animal-borne diseases.

Mouse populations on the Channel Islands have some of the highest rates of Sin Nombre virus ever measured. That, coupled with the isolation and well-defined food webs of the islands, makes them a good system to study what ecological factors affect the presence of the virus.

The data were collected on the Channel Islands shortly after the Four Corners outbreak, to look for relationships between biological and physical island characteristics and the prevalence of Sin Nombre on each of the eight islands. The researchers found that 79 percent of the variation in disease prevalence among the islands could be explained by a single factor – average annual precipitation. Adding in the physical characteristics of the islands and the number of predators accounted for a total of 98 percent of the variation.

Higher infection rates among Channel Island deer mice were strongly associated with more precipitation, larger island area and fewer predator species. The strong effect of precipitation levels highlights potential links between changing climate regimes and human health. The results also suggest that more diverse predator populations could help keep animal-borne diseases in check – an important lesson as top predators like wolves and bears increasingly disappear from ecosystems due to habitat loss and conflicts with humans.

The authors note that future studies should use experimental methods and examine larger systems to evaluate the generality of the observed patterns. Nonetheless, the strength of the associations they found on the Channel Islands is striking. (nsf)


Precipitation, predators may be key in ecological regulation of infectious disease

If you value what we do here, create your ad-free account and support our journalism.

Share:

Producing content you read on this website takes a lot of time, effort, and hard work. If you value what we do here, select the level of your support and register your account.

Your support makes this project fully self-sustainable and keeps us independent and focused on the content we love to create and share.

All our supporters can browse the website without ads, allowing much faster speeds and a clean interface. Your comments will be instantly approved and you’ll have a direct line of communication with us from within your account dashboard. You can suggest new features and apps and you’ll be able to use them before they go live.

You can choose the level of your support.

Stay kind, vigilant and ready!

$5 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Instant comments
  • Direct communication
  • New features and apps suggestions
  • Early access to new apps and features

$50 /year

$10 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Instant comments
  • Direct communication
  • New features and apps suggestions
  • Early access to new apps and features

$100 /year

$25 /month

  • Ad-free account
  • Instant comments
  • Direct communication
  • New features and apps suggestions
  • Early access to new apps and features

$200 /year

You can also support us by sending us a one-off payment using PayPal:

One Comment

  1. As I study the location of the Channel Islands off the
    Southern California coast (particularly Catalina) providing the effectiveness of a huge breakwater and then see how wonderfully the Palos Verdes Peninsula shields the San Pedro Bay from the strong south flowing currents I realize that San Pedro Bay has been a wonderful natural harbor for a long long time. No wonder two of the largest harbors in the modern world are now located there. And maybe that's also why Bob
    Meistrell (Body Glove) found scores of what many believe are ancient Chinese stone anchors in shallow water right off that peninsula that protects that bay. Google: "Hwui Shan-The Land of Women I believe I can show you"

Leave a Reply to Hendon Harris Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.