Research - page 6

raton basin colorado new mexico

Study links Raton Basin earthquakes to oil and gas fluid injections, again

A rash of earthquakes in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico recorded between 2008 and 2010 was likely due to fluids pumped deep underground during oil and gas wastewater disposal, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study. The study, which took place in...

October 26, 2017

4tornado

Scientists use seismic waves to measure tornado intensity

Seismic waves generated by tornadoes when they touch down could be used to measure a twister’s intensity, according to a new study. The new research examined a catastrophic tornado that struck Joplin, Missouri in May 2011 and revealed the size of seismic waves...

October 26, 2017

ucerf3 socal eq

UCERF3: Anticipating aftershocks in Southern California

Southern California has the highest earthquake risk of any region in the U.S., but exactly how risky and where the greatest risks lie remains an open question. Earthquakes occur infrequently and depend on complex geological factors deep underground, making them hard...

October 26, 2017

lightning in the canyon

Lightning produces afterglow of gamma radiation

Researchers previously thought that X-rays and gamma radiation produced by lightning only lasted for a very short time, about one ten-thousandth of a second. However, a new study reveals that the ionizing radiation of lightning appears to emit much longer than...

October 25, 2017

fogo volcano cape verde

New magma pathways after giant lateral volcano collapses

Giant lateral collapses are huge landslides occurring at the flanks of a volcano. Giant lateral collapses are rather common events during the evolution of a large volcanic edifice, often with dramatic consequences such as tsunami and volcano explosions. These...

October 25, 2017

r slide

Why did the 2014 Oso landslide travel so far?

On Saturday, March 22, 2014, a devastating landslide roared across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, near Oso, Washington. The landslide killed 43 people as it plowed through the Steelhead Haven neighborhood. When it stopped, after crossing the river, the...

October 24, 2017

dolphins study

Whales and dolphins have rich 'human-like' cultures and societies

Whales and dolphins (Cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects - much like human societies. A major new study, published recently in Nature Ecology & Evolution, has linked the...

October 24, 2017

Stereo photos of the upper left canine in a lingual b buccal

9 million-year-old teeth suggests earliest human relatives lived in Europe

Researchers in Germany have recovered an unusual set of teeth estimated to be 9.7 million years old. The teeth are unlike any found in Europe or Asia, but closely resemble the teeth of Lucy, the famed female specimen of the hominin species Australopithecus...

October 24, 2017

cascadia zone simulations

50 simulations of the ‘Really Big One’ show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play out

One of the worst nightmares for many Pacific Northwest residents is a huge earthquake along the offshore Cascadia Subduction Zone, which would unleash damaging and likely deadly shaking in coastal Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and northern California. The...

October 23, 2017

153919_web

Saline lakes around the world shrinking at alarming rates

Saline lakes around the world are shrinking in size at alarming rates. Lakes like Utah's Great Salt Lake, Asia's Aral Sea, the Dead Sea in Jordan and Israel, China's huge Lop Nur and Bolivia's Lake Popo are just a few that are in peril. These lakes...

October 23, 2017

coral

Life goes on for marine ecosystems after cataclysmic mass extinction

An international team of scientists, including Dr. Alex Dunhill from the University of Leeds, has found that although the mass extinction in the Late Triassic period wiped out the vast proportion of species, there appears to have been no drastic changes to the way...

October 21, 2017

Amazon rainforest

Environmental impact of Amazonian hydropower significantly underestimated

The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research. The study suggests that estimates of biodiversity and carbon losses associated with tropical hydropower may be higher...

October 21, 2017

laser energy converted into super high energy protons

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

Researchers have discovered a new way to produce high energy photon beams. The new method makes it possible to produce these gamma rays in a highly efficient way, compared with today's technique. The obtained energy is a billion times higher than the energy of...

October 21, 2017

sampling seafloor sediment near queen charlotte fairweather fault

U.S. and Canadian scientists explore major undersea earthquake fault

An international team of scientists just finished probing the depths of the Pacific Ocean offshore of Alaska and British Columbia, to better understand the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault. During the past century, the 1 126 km long (700 miles) fault has generated...

October 20, 2017

2asteroid

Less large near-Earth asteroids than previously thought

Fewer large near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) remain to be discovered than astronomers thought, according to a new analysis by planetary scientist Alan W. Harris of MoreData! in La Canada, California. Harris is presenting his results this week at the 49th annual meeting...

October 20, 2017

9comet 41p Tuttle Giacobini Kresak

Spinning comet rapidly slowed down during close approach to Earth

Astronomers at Lowell Observatory observed comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak last spring and noticed that the speed of its rotation was quickly slowing down. A research team led by David Schleicher studied the comet while it was closer to the Earth than it has ever...

October 19, 2017

153608_web

Ancient, lost, mountains in the Karoo reveals the secrets of massive extinction event

Fossil records near the lost Gondwanides mountains show that the Permian-Triassic extinction started 1 million years prior to what was previously believed. Millions of years ago, a mountain range that would have dwarfed the Andes mountains in South America,...

October 19, 2017