Research - page 5

dolphins study

Whales and dolphins have rich 'human-like' cultures and societies

Whales and dolphins (Cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects - much like human societies. A major new study, published recently in Nature Ecology & Evolution, has linked the...

October 24, 2017

Stereo photos of the upper left canine in a lingual b buccal

9 million-year-old teeth suggests earliest human relatives lived in Europe

Researchers in Germany have recovered an unusual set of teeth estimated to be 9.7 million years old. The teeth are unlike any found in Europe or Asia, but closely resemble the teeth of Lucy, the famed female specimen of the hominin species Australopithecus...

October 24, 2017

cascadia zone simulations

50 simulations of the ‘Really Big One’ show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play out

One of the worst nightmares for many Pacific Northwest residents is a huge earthquake along the offshore Cascadia Subduction Zone, which would unleash damaging and likely deadly shaking in coastal Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and northern California. The...

October 23, 2017

153919_web

Saline lakes around the world shrinking at alarming rates

Saline lakes around the world are shrinking in size at alarming rates. Lakes like Utah's Great Salt Lake, Asia's Aral Sea, the Dead Sea in Jordan and Israel, China's huge Lop Nur and Bolivia's Lake Popo are just a few that are in peril. These lakes...

October 23, 2017

coral

Life goes on for marine ecosystems after cataclysmic mass extinction

An international team of scientists, including Dr. Alex Dunhill from the University of Leeds, has found that although the mass extinction in the Late Triassic period wiped out the vast proportion of species, there appears to have been no drastic changes to the way...

October 21, 2017

Amazon rainforest

Environmental impact of Amazonian hydropower significantly underestimated

The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research. The study suggests that estimates of biodiversity and carbon losses associated with tropical hydropower may be higher...

October 21, 2017

laser energy converted into super high energy protons

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

Researchers have discovered a new way to produce high energy photon beams. The new method makes it possible to produce these gamma rays in a highly efficient way, compared with today's technique. The obtained energy is a billion times higher than the energy of...

October 21, 2017

sampling seafloor sediment near queen charlotte fairweather fault

U.S. and Canadian scientists explore major undersea earthquake fault

An international team of scientists just finished probing the depths of the Pacific Ocean offshore of Alaska and British Columbia, to better understand the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault. During the past century, the 1 126 km long (700 miles) fault has generated...

October 20, 2017

2asteroid

Less large near-Earth asteroids than previously thought

Fewer large near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) remain to be discovered than astronomers thought, according to a new analysis by planetary scientist Alan W. Harris of MoreData! in La Canada, California. Harris is presenting his results this week at the 49th annual meeting...

October 20, 2017

9comet 41p Tuttle Giacobini Kresak

Spinning comet rapidly slowed down during close approach to Earth

Astronomers at Lowell Observatory observed comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak last spring and noticed that the speed of its rotation was quickly slowing down. A research team led by David Schleicher studied the comet while it was closer to the Earth than it has ever...

October 19, 2017

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Ancient, lost, mountains in the Karoo reveals the secrets of massive extinction event

Fossil records near the lost Gondwanides mountains show that the Permian-Triassic extinction started 1 million years prior to what was previously believed. Millions of years ago, a mountain range that would have dwarfed the Andes mountains in South America,...

October 19, 2017

estimated population with arsenic usa

Study estimates about 2.1 million people in United States use wells high in arsenic

A new study by the US Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates about 2.1 million people in the United States. may be getting their drinking water from private domestic wells considered to have high concentrations of arsenic,...

October 19, 2017

giza pyramids egypt

Volcanic eruptions linked to social unrest in Ancient Egypt

Around 245 BCE Ptolemy III, ruler of the Ptolemaic Kingdom in Egypt, made a decision that still puzzles many historians: After pursuing a successful military campaign against the kingdom's nemesis, the Seleucid Empire, centered mainly in present-day Syria and...

October 18, 2017

new study analyses volcanic fatalities in more detail than ever before

New study analyses volcanic fatalities in more detail than ever before

Building on existing information and databases relating to volcanic fatalities, scientists from the University of Bristol have, for the first time, been able to classify victims by activity or occupation and look at the distance of their death from the volcano. It...

October 18, 2017

lusi volcano

Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruption

On May 29, 2006, mud started erupting from several sites on the Indonesian island of Java. Boiling mud, water, rocks and gas poured from newly-created vents in the ground, burying entire towns and compelling many Indonesians to flee. By September 2006, the largest...

October 17, 2017

goce

The missing mass — what is causing a geoid low in the Indian Ocean?

The Earth’s interior is still a mystery to us. While we have sent missions to probe the outer reaches of our solar system, the deepest boreholes on Earth go down to only a few kilometers. The only way to learn what’s going on deep inside our planet, in...

October 17, 2017

verkhoyansk mountains shaka republik yakutia russia

Winter cold extremes linked to high-altitude polar vortex weakening

Over the last decades, the stratospheric polar vortex has shifted towards more frequent weak states which can explain Eurasian cooling trends in boreal winter in the era of Arctic amplification. When the strong winds that circle the Arctic slacken, cold polar air...

October 17, 2017