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Severe rains continue to sweep Florida: The worst flood in the last 65 years hits Tampa

severe-rains-continue-to-sweep-florida-the-worst-flood-in-the-last-65-years-hits-tampa

Heavy rainfall which was continually falling across Tampa, Florida, since July 20, 2015, has caused severe flooding in the area. 40 people were evacuated from their mobile homes in Sherwood Forest RV and Caledesi Travel Trailer Park, on August 3, as the water levels varied between 91.4 and 122 cm (3 and 4 feet). The Pasco County Sheriff's Office described the situation as the worst flood in the last 65 years.

Torrential rainfalls during the last two weeks were reported to bring over 15.2 cm (half a foot) of water to some areas, closing down about 50 roads in the region. On a few days during this intensive rainfall period, between 50.8 and 76.2 mm (2 and 3 inches) of rain was reported to have fallen. The amount of recorded precipitation rose to about 102 mm (4 inches) of rain, on Saturday, August 1 and Sunday, August 2.

72-hr rainfall accumulation until August 4, 2015 at 15:00 UTC. Image credit: Google / NASA/JAXA GPM.

Additional 50.8 mm (2 inches) were reported to fall until Monday, August 3, when the flood warning was in effect for the area until 20:30 UTC. By early Monday morning, Tampa has measured over 203 mm (8 inches) of rainfall more than during the entire average month of August, according to the Weather Channel.

Video credit: WFLA News Channel 8

Over 36 people were saved by the rescue workers from the flood related incidents. Almost 102 mm (4 inches) of rain was recorded within a 24 hour period at the Tampa International Airport on Monday, causing numerous flight cancelations.

470 mm (18.5 inches) have been recorded in Tarpon Springs during the last 10 days. The measured precipitation amount has set a record for the wettest July ever recorded in Trapon Springs. 178 mm (7 inches) of rainfall was reported to fall Sunday overnight, August 2, while 152 mm (6 inches) of rainfall was recorded in parts of Pasco County.

Video credit: WFLA News Channel 8

The National Hurricane Center said there is 10 percent chance for the current weak low pressure area to turn into a tropical storm. The Weather Service forecasted the worst of the weather should pass away by Tuesday, August 4.

Featured image: Flooding in Tampa, Florida, August 4, 2015. Image credit: @guidobaechler

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2 Comments

  1. Only the Oligarchs can afford to live in the best parts of the State so I laugh my head off whenever the ultimate and eventual conclusion of the State’s future shows itself. there is no question in my mind that Florida is going to be under water within the next fifty years and sooner for some areas. These same elites who spend millions for a home on the water in that state are going to lose their whole investment but they deserve it because they are the same corporate felons who caused climate change in the first place.

  2. The usual news blackouts in USA on these frightening events in Florida. Beyond terror of climate change (or whatever name it gets) education and real news is urgently needed. Surely the media can’t hide these kind of extreme weather occurrences forever, can they?

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